Last Christmas, I couldn’t find Winnie-the-Pooh books for the Kindle. The only A.A. Milne story I’d found was an obscure comic mystery he’d written in 1922. But by spring, it looks like Pooh bear had magically crept out of the Hundred Acre Wood, and squeezed his way onto the Kindle, since you can now buy Kindle editions of both
Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner.

And it’s not just the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. A. A. Milne also published two books of children’s poetry – When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six. Many of the poems mention Christopher Robin, and there’s also a few that are specifically about Winnie-the-Pooh, as Milne explains in the book’s introduction.

Pooh wants us to say that he thought it was a different book; and he hopes you won’t mind, but he walked through it one day, looking for his friend Piglet, and sat down on some of the pages by mistake.

Best of all, they include all of the memorable original illustrations by Ernest H. Shepard. Since the illustrations were already in black and white, they look great on the Kindle. And there’s something really precious about seeing those old-fashioned children’s book images on the screen of my 21st-century reading machine.

By the way, am I the only person who thinks A. A. Milne should be one of the authors included among the Kindle’s screensaver images?

2 Responses to “How Winnie-the-Pooh came to the Kindle”

  1. Why Beatrix Potter Would Love The Kindle | Disinformation Says:

    […] there’s another new set of illustrations on the way, though as recently as December there were no Kindle versions of Winnie-the Pooh. “But by spring, it looks like Pooh bear had […]

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    […] or locales is entirely coincidental.” Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)How Winnie-the-Pooh came to the KindleBeatrix Potter Illustrations on the KindleSecret Weapon in the eBook Price Wars Posted in […]

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